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Links dealing with Robert Kingett are to the right. For screen reader users it will be a heading past the blog posts

New team members and collaborating with RNIB

Over these past few weeks, we have been collaborating with a lot of different people and getting many team members acclimated to the blog dashboard so they can post audio, video, or regular blogs whenever they want to.

We have gained 10 new team members in the past week so we are all working to update the site, collaborate, and they are all working on their wicked introductions that they want to share. Some of them will be audioboos, others will be YouTube videos, and others will be epic blog posts.

Amidst all of the initiations, we have been talking to the RNIB about initiating a dialogue and a deeper partnership regarding Netflix and our future plans of action that we are strategizing.

At 10 AM Central Time, Wednesday, April 23, RNIB, Joel Snyder from the audio description project, Kim from the ACB, and a few team members from our campaign will participate in a Skype call to discuss matters relating to audio description and accessibility. As we’re working towards the next step in advocacy, we want to be sure that this will benefit people in different countries, such as the UK since Netflix is available in countries other than the United States.

At the moment, we are trying to connect with various people, locally, nationally, and internationally to form a toothsome voice for accessible media services on the web. When we can, we will release details.

What’s after RNIB? CNIB in Canada! If anyone knows people in CNIB, point them to us and tell them to have a poke around our site!

Zagga TV, audio description on-demand for the whole family

In the past few months we have made some advancements and discoveries regarding audio description and Netflix, as well as alternatives such as TalkingFlix. We’re here to tell you about another audio description on demand service that provides audio description for the whole family, not just the blind, and the visually impaired based out of Canada. The service is called Zagga TV, created by Zagga Entertainment. Zagga entertainment founded in January of 2012 and they were incorporated in February of that year.

The website is http://zagga.tv/

The tagline of the site appears to be watch what you want, where you want, instantly and accessibly, as that’s exactly what the service aims to do, provide on demand described movies and or TV shows, with video, for the entire family to enjoy.

According to the website, “they understand the frustration that comes with discovering your cable company’s VOD website is inaccessible. They have felt the aggravation over finding no described video titles on the most popular VOD platforms. This is why they are here. Zagga Entertainment makes watching described movies and TV shows easy, convenient and fun,” they write on their about page. This service will also make the described videos accessible on mobile devices, as well.

A portion of your monthly subscription fee will go towards professionally describing more movies and TV shows for every Zagga Entertainment subscriber to enjoy

The home page has a magnificent promo video that details what the service will be about. The video has wonderfully crisp audio description, as well.

The site has many links to browse through, including a samples page of some videos with audio description, and what they might look like on the platform as well as a news page with Canadian newspapers and media outlets. International web surfers may have a hard time accessing all of the news content, such as the audio and the video, but the Zagga website is open for anyone to browse through.

Their contact page is http://zagga.tv/contact-us/ just in case users want to ask questions or schedule a press related interview.

No details have been issued yet as to the cost of the monthly fee, and it appears that they don’t have a credits’ system such as TalkingFlix, but we’re sure this will be a profitable alternative to other video on demand services that are completely inaccessible or refuse inaccessibility altogether.

Their Indiegogo campaign gives their audience a chance to figuratively “take ownership” of the launch of this service and be directly involved with starting it.

If you’re blind or have low vision it would be worthwhile considering canceling your inaccessible subscription with mainstream providers and consider Zagga as a new, and hip, Netflix for the blind.

It will be interesting to see how Zagga TV and TalkingFlix will hold their own after the official launch of both platforms but this is a great year for audio description on demand! If mainstream VOD providers don’t realize they will lose subscribers, perhaps the plummeting numbers will convince them after the two services are in full swing.

I’m invited to be a panelist at the 2014 ACB convention!

Originally posted on The Chicago Dream:

It truly is amazing when I wake up and see an email that makes my eyes fall out of my head in utter shock and total wow! A neat thing has just happened, I was asked to be a panelist at the ACB convention on audio description in los Vegas, Nevada! The conference will be in July, specifically on July 13 through the15th. The panel will consist of a number of people talking about their advocacy for audio description and also, how to get audio description noticed in broader forms of media. I was so shocked when I looked at the email that I immediately forgot how to act like a rational 24-year-old human being as I tore through my studio apartment pumping the air with my fist and strutting about as if I had been given Denzel Washington for my birthday. The text reads as follows. The person who…

View original 660 more words

Netflix keeps refusing accessibility and audio description

Over the last few months, we have been trying to get a definitive answer about whose responsibility is it to provide audio description during production, and after production and broadcasting. It has taken a while to get answers to these questions because it’s a very complicated matter simply because audio description is not as mainstreamed as we all would like audio description to be. Since it is very new naturally, one person appeared to handle it but it turns out that the person initially contacted doesn’t handle audio description at all, even the legal aspect, but here’s an email to try! This process repeated for several months. The good thing, however, is that we finally have a definitive answer regarding audio description on all sides, the TV side and the web side of things.

The text below is from a team member, who wishes to remain nameless, that explains audio description in the past, and going forward, as far as the TV network side of things. We have been utilizing all of our connections to get this answer.

Moving forward on new T.V. Shows and Movies, it will be the studios responsibility to handle the described video. On older titles the studios, production companies, and networks are all arguing over whose responsibility it is to provide described video, and of course this is nowhere near a resolution. The issue on future shows and movies is also complicated as the work for described video is costly, and there is a writer guild issue, meaning will the Described Video that is being provided for a movie or television show is considered Writers Guild work or nonunion work? Obviously again this is a compensation issue and nothing has been determined as of yet. While this all sounds like a lot, the good that I take away from all of this is that Described Video is on the Studios and Production Houses radar and I’m sure all of this will be settled the next time contract negotiations with the WGA takes place.

It’s no question that the people who are responsible for producing audio description are, as the above said, the studios. They have to actively engage in audio description, that means contacting audio description companies and working with them up until production and even, in some cases, after. Once it airs on TV and in movies. studios have definitely done what they needed to do by way of audio description and don’t need to do anything more. Since the studios included audio description on the TV show and or movie they are not responsible for other forms of media to provide the same audio description on other platforms. That responsibility lies with a different party altogether.

In the beginning stages of the project we have tried to contact Netflix about adding audio description to their streaming TV shows and movies, thinking that it was their responsibility to provide audio description onto their platform since the audio description that we wanted to see, current audio description that was on TV, on Netflix as well. They have sent us email after email pointing fingers at the studios that produce these shows. They told us repeatedly that audio description on their service didn’t have anything to do with their decisions. Naturally, this didn’t make  any sense since, if it was broadcasted with audio description elsewhere then Netflix would have to be responsible since they are distributing content that has audio description elsewhere and not on their platform.

They kept telling us   no, that they are not, and or would never be responsible for providing audio description on their platform. This is incorrect. Netflix are, without a doubt, responsible. We’re just not sure why they don’t want to do it. We’re not sure why they keep pointing the finger at the TV studios when the studios have done what they needed to do and provide audio description for their respected platform. In this case, on TV. It’s Netflix who should be asking for those audio description tracks along with the TV show files but they are not and they keep telling everyone who asks about it that they are not responsible. This is a bold-faced lie. They are, without a doubt, responsible. They just don’t want to admit that they are responsible nor provide audio description.

Since Netflix is hosting the content that has audio description elsewhere and not on their platform they are definitely responsible for ensuring that the content has audio description on their platform as well.

Netflix definitely has a responsibility to provide it if an already described track is available. Since we know who does what and who’s in charge of what going forward, this will be a good way to tell Netflix that the people who you need to be talking to are clearly defined and also, that you are not doing it at all. It’s the studio’s job to make the audio description. They have done so, and are even broadcasting it on TV. The responsibility to distribute audio description on different platforms lies within the platform creator. In this case it would be Reed. He’s the creator of the platform. Netflix are actively not making any efforts at all to have audio description.

As a side note, they are not making any accessibility initiatives either, for screen reader and magnifier users, on the desktop environment and on the mobile side of things but that will be for a different blog post.

Since Netflix have refused to provide audio description and, also, provide a fully accessible interface, we are asking for your help more than ever. Let them know they are responsible but they are refusing to be responsible. Be sure to let other video on demand companies know this is wrong and we hope other video on demand services don’t follow in Netflix’s business practice. We hope that other video on demand services do not make this kind of business practice their own. Everyone should be able to enjoy the same content as others.

Share your Netflix accessibility experiences on our YouTube channel.

Today we have just launched our YouTube channel, where we will host videos relating to Netflix accessibility as well as other accessibility matters created entirely by you!

The channel will be user driven and community driven, so everyone will get a chance to have their voices heard. There are two ways to send videos to us to host on our channel and they will be explained below.

All videos will be added to a playlist so that way users won’t be uploading anything directly to our account. Besides, YouTube doesn’t have that option.

Users can submit any video that they wish to be included in our channel. You can submit anything from VLOGS to a screen capture demonstrating accessibility matters. If it’s a screen capture that you are doing, please have audio with the video, otherwise, we will ask that you record the video again.

Even though you can submit anything to the channel, we do ask two things from you.

Don’t swear excessively. Obviously you can express yourself in a way that you wish but excessive swearing isn’t something we want to hear.

Keep background noise to a minimum.

That’s it! That’s all that we ask. now we will explain how to send your videos to us.

If you have a YouTube account you can just upload your video to your own channel, with “Accessible Netflix Project” somewhere in the title, and send us the URL to the video and then we can add it to our playlist. There’s a contact us link in the navigation bar where people can send their links or just message our YouTube channel.

If you want to send in your video by email send it to 817pteeocbrg@m.youtube.com

The subject line will be your yitle and the message body will be the description

If you don’t have a YouTube you can upload your video to our drop box, or use send space to send the file to us.

If you’re in the United States you will have to use this link because that’s just how the service works!

http://www.jotform.us/form/40764616111145

If you are sending your file outside the United States, click the below link.

http://www.jotform.com/form/40764616111145

If you want to send the file via send space visit https://www.sendspace.com/ and enter our email address, found by clicking contact us.

Here’s our YouTube playlist your video will appear on.

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLE0OTlH8QBWMr3O4OQNbJi0ltWnLXTCvt

And here’s the YouTube account page.

http://www.youtube.com/user/netflixproject

National news outlets are writing about The Accessible Netflix Project!

While the accessible Netflix project is working very hard behind the scenes in regards to our next course of action after sending our letter wishing to dialogue, news outlets have been noticing us and promoting us and even rooting for us, which is beyond epic!

There are a few blogs and news articles, podcasts, and videos that didn’t quite make their way towards us, but a quick Google search brought them up and now they are on our press page, as appropriate.

There are a lot of interviews that I, Robert Kingett, have been having with a lot of people. Some of which are listed below.

The Huffington post.

AMI, accessible media Inc. in Canada.

The New York Times.

RNIB’s evening show.

COAT, The coalition for accessible technology,

And more will be on the way. Links will show up on our press page as they are published and or aired on a podcast.

There’s even news about us that we don’t even know about straight away, which is totally great! It’s refreshing to see people reading our news on the air and also planning for future interviews.

RNIB’s morning edition had a discussion about us some time ago, and the file below is the entire segment they had, which was epically done, by the way.

Link to audio file. http://recordings.talkshoe.com/TC-130496/TS-840656.mp3

We have news as well about new partnerships that we are forming as well, but that will be for another blog post!

As all of this is happening behind the blog, viewers and readers can still help us in many ways. Any small thing is highly appreciated.

People could also guest blog their accessibility experiences with Netflix and or attempts to do what we are attempting to do.

In other news, we’re trying to get a hold of VOD Film services in the UK to ask about adding audio description for their services. At the moment, the only provider that we know of that offers audio description on demand of recent episodes of certain TV shows is the BBC via IPlayer, which is not available to international viewers.

Since none of our small team is in the UK geographically, we cannot reach anyone definitive at these companies via phone. Email is our only option. I, myself, have tried to email a lot of people, but must of the time I can only find a generic email. I message that anyway but a generic response comes back to me about activating my account.

We have been trying to get someone at Hulu, still, and or Amazon as well, even though they are only available in the United States but make no mistake of it; we will definitely reach out to these video streaming services while we work on the next definite step with Netflix that will happen this year. Stay tuned!

Robert Kingett talks with Insight Radio about Netflix accessibility, and an accessible Netflix alternative

Due to be released later this year, TalkingFlix is an accessible alternative to netflix, where you can listen to audio described movies and television shows. Allan Russell spoke to Robert Kingett to find out more.

Click here to download and listen to the audio

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