Daredevil season 2 may be described

With the release of Daredevil season 2 acquired by Netflix on April 21, many wonder if season 2 will have audio description just as season one does. It appears that season 2 of Daredevil will not be described. At least, Netflix has no idea if season 2 will be described.

In a blog post, Netflix has stated original shows will be described, including Daredevil, House of Cards, Orange is the New Black, Marco Polo, and others, but the blog post was not clear about the availability of audio description for seasons beyond the first season.

With the announcement of season 2 of Daredevil, the Accessible Netflix Project team immediately reached out to Netflix to inquire if the next season be described as well. We assumed it was. Netflix doesn’t want to comment on the matter.

In an Email from Cliff Edwards, Director of Corporate Communications at Netflix, he clearly states,

We haven’t announced a release date on DD season 2, nor have we commented on which originals will have audio descriptions beyond the blog posting a couple of weeks ago. You can refer to that blog for a discussion on future plans.

Thanks “

when asked for clarification, Edwards directed us to his first Email, telling us that if we wanted to use something, we can consult the blog.

It would, quite frankly, make sense to describe all seasons of a show. No more information has been released on this matter but it is safe to assume that Daredevil will have AD for the entire run.

Daredevil petition and audio description advances with Amazon.

We have good news in the accessibility world today regarding Netflix and daredevil and audio description, and Amazon instant and Amazon

a Change.org user by the name of Ryan Dyck in Arlington, VA has created a petition to Netflix, asserting they should make their original show described so the blind and the visually impaired can enjoy this show.

The petition is titled “Make Daredevil Available to The Blind Community”

in other news, Amazon is looking into adding an audio description filter to their DVD searches in the USA. On Amazon UK there’s an audio description filter that lists all DVDs the UK has with audio description. Users can even narrow down the described DVD’s by genre, studio, ETC.

with a bit of advocating on Twitter, Amazon is actively listening.

That’s not all, however. They have said that Amazon instant might be a possibility regarding hosting streamed movies and TV shows with audio description.

At the time of this writing they have not provided us with direct contacts yet but we will update this page with any new developments

UPDATED: DCMP’s channel brings media accessibility to Roku

As we investigate tips that are coming into our inbox, we have a bit of news regarding video on demand accessibility on the Roku platform.

On Twitter , someone sent a tweet entitled, DCMP activates channel on Roku. The link provided was to an announcement by DCMP. DCMP has enabled their channel to all Roku platforms in the later editions of Roku, including the newer models. Based on quick research, I’d recommend the Roku 3.

here’s a link to buy one on Amazon

just to be sure you get the latest Roku, here’s their home page

DCMP has educational videos for disabled students. This move allows students who have a Roku to access accessible content.

Even though the Roku platform is inaccessible to the blind and the visually impaired this is still extremely great news. Other companies, like TalkingFlix and Zagga TV, should follow suit, if they are not planning to do so already. Updates have not been released by either service.

According to the announcement, these are the requirements.

Any model Roku device (starting at $49, to purchase a Roku visit: www.roku.com).

  • A broadband Internet connection that delivers at least 1.5 Mbps. (Almost all schools will have a connection that meets this requirement, as do most homes with DSL or cable Internet service.)
  • To connect your Roku device to the Internet via Wi-Fi or with an Ethernet cable.
  • A free DCMP account with streaming privileges. (Teachers, other professionals, and family members whose use benefits students who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind, visually impaired, or deaf-blind qualify for DCMP services. There are no user registration or service fees.)

we have reached out to Roku regarding making their device accessible and have yet to hear back from them.

Stay tuned, however, as we’re hot on an audio description tip. Audio description is coming to Netflix in a few months. We will publish when we have all of the information.

update: DCMP replied with the below statement regarding Roku accessibility when I inquired about contacts at Roku to discuss making an accessible device for the blind.

Kyle Sis, I.T manager at DCMP had this to say.

We really don’t have any good contacts at Roku.  Our channel went through the exact same approval process as normal channels.

Long ago (in 2009) we got early access to the Roku API by emailing a few of the higher-ups at Roku, but that contact dried up several years ago.  We did a ton of research regarding the possibility of making the device accessible.  It doesn’t seem possible given the current OS and development environment.

We discussed quite a few options including creating an accessible Roku remote control iOS app (they have an API for that).  We then realized there’s no way to get navigational information back from the Roku, it’s one-way communication.  The closest we ever got was attempting to mirror each navigation movement on the app and the Roku simultaneously, but if they got out of sync the VO would be leading the viewer astray.

The only thing we can come up with is possibly being able to make a single channel accessible if you developed it using their native SDK (which has very limited public access; only a handful of channels have used it).  The public SDK uses a proprietary language called bright-script and is very limited.  We really don’t know since we’ve never had access to the native SDK.  I might reach out to their dev team and see if they would give us access.  Or possibly just give us access to the documentation.

Apple TV bug allows audio description on Netflix show

Reports from several Apple TV users in the USA have stated that the popular Netflix show New Girl has an audio description on by default in some of it’s episodes

According to the users, Many people have been watching the shows to see if a repeat occurrence would happen but all reported that only 2 episodes in season 2 have the audio description track on by default. The episodes are one and two.

When played on different devices, such as a laptop, however, the audio description does not play at all. The audio description does not play on tablets, video game systems, and mobile viewing devices.

A forum illustrates that this has been noted by the sighted community as well.

Netflix didn’t want to comment on the glitch but they kept assuring me that the problem with the audio description would be resolved as soon as possible, even after I told the operator I didn’t see it as a glitch. I wanted more of it on different shows because it would allow me, as a blind man, to watch shows.

I was unable to get a definitive answer from Apple regarding the Apple TV and a possible stream intercept. A Netflix representative assumed I was calling in a “problem,” and assured me that the team are working hard to fix the issue as quickly as possible, even after I explained that I’d like more of the so called, glitch, on other episodes and TV shows.

Since it can’t be replicated on any other device, even video game systems, it’s a safe assumption that only Apple TV owners will hear the audio description on the episodes. If the audio file were on their servers then people using different devices would be able to hear the audio description as well. If it is, indeed, on the Netflix server, then that’s definitive proof they are choosing to not use these audio files that have the description track.

Audio description is on the way to an official Netflix only show, however. stay tuned for an investigative report on that.

Audio description advances and push back from Netflix again

It’s a new year and that means new advances are popping up in the tech world, and on our blog, and in the world of audio description on demand.

While our team has been sleeping and getting fat over the holidays others have been very hard at work prepping their audio description on demand services for the public. Note that we don’t have many updates to talk about because these kinds of services rely on two critical aspects: content and funding, which take a while to secure. Both companies have made significant strides in each area.

Zagga Entertainment or Zagga TV.

Zagga TV has been making strides with licensing and development. Their website has undergone some changes. The text size has increased site wide and the links are easier to see visually. Some links have been removed from the main navigation bar, such as the samples link, but the about the team link now includes links to LinkedIn profiles.

According to a blog post the founder, Kevin, wrote, they have already acquired content deals.

We’ve also been busy this year speaking to the studios about licensing great content for our VOD service. We’re very happy to report that we have landed our first two content deals with two great Canadian distributors and we are happily closing deals with two Hollywood distributors offering us movies and TV shows from a wide range of genres, including children’s programming. We’ll be making an announcement about this once the contracts are officially signed. Other studios are in the wings waiting to sign on with us and we’re thrilled that they see described video as a worthwhile endeavour for them and for us.

Further, down, he illustrates the progression of the development, even though they didn’t reach their fund raising goal. $18,926 CAD was raised out of a $50,000 goal. This campaign ended on June 14, 2014.

in a video Kevin Shaw provides a sneak peek of the Zagga iPad app and provides a look ahead to the service.

TalkingFlix.

TalkingFlix has made more website changes than anything else. The site has cleaned up very nicely with a new accessibility menu on all pages. The main layout of the website is still high contrast friendly and users can still sign up to get credits for referring people to the service, which will apply to their account when the service launches.

Here is a nifty update straight from the TalkingFlix news blog about where they are at and what they are doing to move forward with the launch.

Netflix.

What advances has Netflix been making by way of audio description this year? Telling the CRTC no regarding described video, pretty much the same way they told us no several times.

Netflix knows it’s not doing the right thing by not providing described content if the content already exists. In a company, however, money talks. With the launch of Zagga TV and TalkingFlix blind and visually impaired people will not need Netflix anymore because there will be a service that is accessible that they can turn their dollars to. Eventually, perhaps, Netflix will realize that a significant portion of their revenue is dwindling but the hopes the company will fully acknowledge and support the needs of blind customers is a bit of a stretch. Netflix has shown, time and time again, that they have no plans to support the blind populace.

Better services are on the way, however, that take care of the entertainment needs of the blind. This year is certainly shaping out to be an epic year!

Help us contact studios about audio description on Netflix

Hi all. Here’s what we’ve been doing since we have been quiet. Since Netflix has said no to us regarding audio description even though Fox will give all future described episodes to Netflix, We’ve been trying to get studios that provide audio description on DVDs and TV shows to give those files to Netflix for free. We’re having a difficult time obtaining studio contacts so this is where we ask our readers to assist. Here’s how.

In the navigation bar there will be two links that point to TV stations and studio contact information. Below we will provide the movie studios that provide audio description on most of their DVDs. use the links above to contact studios on our behalf. The more, the mariner. If you’re unable to navigate to the links, we will provide the studio contact information below but not the TV stations contact info, as that is always changing and we won’t have time to continuously visit the link above.

Below will be the studios and their contact information. Unfortunately we could not obtain emails easily so we will also provide the website as well as phone number and physical address.

If possible, try to mention a DVD that has both audio description and is also available on Netflix or other streaming services such as Hulu and Amazon Instant and RedBox. Say that you want to have audio description on streaming as well. Thank you!

Disney / Pixar / Buena Vista

500 S. Buena Vista Street

Burbank, CA 91521

818-560-1000

Fox

Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp.

10201 W. Pico Blvd.

Los Angeles, CA 90035

310-369-1000

www.foxmovies.com

Paramount

Paramount Pictures Corporation

5555 Melrose Ave

Los Angeles, CA 90038

323-956-5000

Sony

Sony Pictures Entertainment

10202 W. Washington Blvd

Culver City, CA 90232

310-244-4000

Universal.

Universal Pictures

100 Universal City Plazas

Universal City, CA 91608

818-777-1000