Audio description advances and push back from Netflix again

It’s a new year and that means new advances are popping up in the tech world, and on our blog, and in the world of audio description on demand.

While our team has been sleeping and getting fat over the holidays others have been very hard at work prepping their audio description on demand services for the public. Note that we don’t have many updates to talk about because these kinds of services rely on two critical aspects: content and funding, which take a while to secure. Both companies have made significant strides in each area.

Zagga Entertainment or Zagga TV.

Zagga TV has been making strides with licensing and development. Their website has undergone some changes. The text size has increased site wide and the links are easier to see visually. Some links have been removed from the main navigation bar, such as the samples link, but the about the team link now includes links to LinkedIn profiles.

According to a blog post the founder, Kevin, wrote, they have already acquired content deals.

We’ve also been busy this year speaking to the studios about licensing great content for our VOD service. We’re very happy to report that we have landed our first two content deals with two great Canadian distributors and we are happily closing deals with two Hollywood distributors offering us movies and TV shows from a wide range of genres, including children’s programming. We’ll be making an announcement about this once the contracts are officially signed. Other studios are in the wings waiting to sign on with us and we’re thrilled that they see described video as a worthwhile endeavour for them and for us.

Further, down, he illustrates the progression of the development, even though they didn’t reach their fund raising goal. $18,926 CAD was raised out of a $50,000 goal. This campaign ended on June 14, 2014.

in a video Kevin Shaw provides a sneak peek of the Zagga iPad app and provides a look ahead to the service.

TalkingFlix.

TalkingFlix has made more website changes than anything else. The site has cleaned up very nicely with a new accessibility menu on all pages. The main layout of the website is still high contrast friendly and users can still sign up to get credits for referring people to the service, which will apply to their account when the service launches.

Here is a nifty update straight from the TalkingFlix news blog about where they are at and what they are doing to move forward with the launch.

Netflix.

What advances has Netflix been making by way of audio description this year? Telling the CRTC no regarding described video, pretty much the same way they told us no several times.

Netflix knows it’s not doing the right thing by not providing described content if the content already exists. In a company, however, money talks. With the launch of Zagga TV and TalkingFlix blind and visually impaired people will not need Netflix anymore because there will be a service that is accessible that they can turn their dollars to. Eventually, perhaps, Netflix will realize that a significant portion of their revenue is dwindling but the hopes the company will fully acknowledge and support the needs of blind customers is a bit of a stretch. Netflix has shown, time and time again, that they have no plans to support the blind populace.

Better services are on the way, however, that take care of the entertainment needs of the blind. This year is certainly shaping out to be an epic year!

Advertisements

One thought on “Audio description advances and push back from Netflix again

  1. I applaud the effort this website is trying to achieve, but I fear the movement doesn’t fully understand why streaming video companies like Netflix shrug their shoulders. The issue is cost. It’s true that DVS does exist for many of the movies Netflix offers, however in order for them to offer DVS, it has to be encoded in the file they stream to include alternate audio tracks. Much of the existing content Netflix offers in fact does not even offer Spanish as an alternate. Now let’s look at it from a perspective of they suddenly have a change of heart. The cost and man hours to reconvert all of their content to include the alternate language tracks on a DVD or BluRay for example. Does anyone involved on this site have any estimate on how much that would cost in man hours? Also keep in mind there is no FCC regulation that states they have to do what is being asked. Even if their were, if a company has offshore servers, it wouldn’t technically fall within FCC regulations, thus rendering any FCC regulation null and void. Granted technically the files Netflix streams can be re-encoded to include alternate audio, but when the demand is for their entire library, it does become cost prohibitive for them to want to do so out of the kindness of their heart.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s